Click photo to enlarge
The Log House was built in 1832 in Berwick Township, Adams County, for a family of 11 people. Members of the the East Berlin Historic Preservation Society paid $1 for the house and dismantled, moved and rebuilt it in East Berlin in 1980 and 1981. The photo above shows the house being dismantled in 1980.

The East Berlin Historic Preservation Society maintains five historic buildings and offers an educational hands-on program to give the younger generation a taste of history.

The society owns and maintains Red Men's Hall, Swigart's Mill and the Log House. It also maintains two additional properties: Liberty No. 1 Engine House, which is owned by the borough; and the Church Schoolhouse, which is owned by the Union Cemetery Association.

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Red Men's Hall had a list of uses over the years.

"It was home to Cashman's Hardware Store, a craft store, a pool hall, a schoolhouse, a meat market and bake shop," society President Bev Jadus said.

Earlier image of Swigart s Mill.
Earlier image of Swigart s Mill. (SUBMITTED)

Built in 1849 by the Stambaughs for their carriage works, it was later bought by the Order of Red Men to house their Oniska Tribe No. 40. Bought by the society in 1990, it houses a museum and library and serves as the society's headquarters.

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Swigart's Mill, built in 1794, is the only original mill on Beaver Creek that's still standing. The society bought it in 1976 and much of the restoration work was done by volunteers, Jadus said.

The mill was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and is the site of the society's annual Christmas party.

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The Log House was built in 1832 in Berwick Township, Adams County, for a family of 11 people.


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Society members paid $1 for the house and dismantled, moved and rebuilt it in East Berlin in 1980 and 1981, Jadus said.

Everyone pitched in to do the work, and much of the chinking between the logs was done by the female members of the group.

"We did not have horsehair for the chinking so we used human hair and when we had the first rain storm it all fell out and had to be redone," Jadus said.

The house is 21 feet by 23 feet, has V-notched logs, hand-cut nails and spikes, and joists and cross beams fastened with wooden pegs. It has a stone-and-brick fireplace with the addition of a stove made by the East Berlin Foundry.

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Liberty No. 1 Engine House was built in 1892.

The jail once there was removed, but the tiny barred windows remain. Under a 99-year lease with the borough, the society agreed to

restore the building. That included exterior work, repair of the bell tower and restoration of the bell. Volunteers are now restoring the interior.

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The Church Schoolhouse, built in 1769, was home to several German church schools and a meeting place for the Berlin Improvement Society and the Berlin Beneficial Society.

Scott Merryman works on a broom in the vendor booth he shared with his wife, Carol, during East Berlin s Colonial Day in 2010. Colonial Day is the second
Scott Merryman works on a broom in the vendor booth he shared with his wife, Carol, during East Berlin s Colonial Day in 2010. Colonial Day is the second Saturday in September, and includes traditional craft vendors, demonstrations, food and a raffle of a handmade quilt, tinware, pottery and similar items. (SUBMITTED)

A potbellied stove still provides heat, windows and hanging oil lamps are the only sources of light and a stool with a dunce hat sits in the corner.

The school closed in 1930. The East Berlin Lions Club began work to preserve the school in the early 1960s and the society has been responsible for its restoration and care since 1983.

Events

THE EAST BERLIN HISTORIC PRESERVATION SOCIETY holds several events to raise funds for its ongoing projects.

· The antique show held in May to coincide with the York Antique Show features dealers with 18th- and 19th-century textiles, paintings, tinware, toys, dolls, ceramics and ironware.

· Colonial Day, held on the second Saturday in September, includes more than 100 traditional craft vendors; demonstrations; food; and a raffle of a handmade quilt, tinware, pottery and similar items.

· A Christmas craft show is held on the last Saturday in November or the first Saturday in December at the Log House, and the Christmas house tour is held in the even years.

· The society meets bimonthly beginning in January and publishes a newsletter, The Informer. More information is available at ebhpspa.org.

Hands-on

THIRD- AND FOURTH-GRADE STUDENTS can learn about life in the East Berlin area in the late 18th and early 19th centuries through the East Berlin Historical Preservation Society's educational hands-on program.

Different activities are held at three of the society's buildings with a focus on life in the East Berlin area during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

"Karen Sheaffer heads up our school program.

At Redmen's Hall we have a textile program where students card, spin and dye wool and weave it into cloth," society president Bev Jadus said.

At the log house they learn about hearth cooking, then it's on to the schoolhouse, where they learn about early education and try out some playground games.

The program is staffed with volunteers and all fees are used to ensure education of future groups.

The committee is always looking for volunteers to help with the program.

For details, call 717-259-0822 or email ebhps@comcast.net.

How about a visit?

The Weekly Record staff would like to get to know your community.

Want us to visit your business, group meeting or event? Let us know by emailing Brittany Wilson at bwilson@ydr.com or calling 717-771-2102.

What's next?

The stories we publish in the Weekly Record and online at www.inyork.com/community are not possible without help from readers like you.

We are working on some fun, interesting stories in the next few weeks and months and we your memories, photos and input are needed.

Please include your full name, age and the municipality in which you live. If you are submitting a photo, include a brief description of what's happening in the photo and the names of everyone in it.

Emailed photos should be in .jpg format at the highest possible quality, at least 200 dpi. We must receive a self-addressed, stamped envelope in order to return mailed photos.

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Coming this month:

DO YOU GO ALL OUT when decorating for Halloween? Is your theme scary, or more on the cute side? When do you usually decorate for Halloween?

We'd love to see photos of your Halloween decorations, past and present, and hear some stories or memories that go along with them.

Share your photos online at ydr.com/gallery or email them to rose@ydr.com or weekly@ydr.com and include a brief description.

Submissions must be received by Sunday.

GHOSTS AND GOBLINS are on the mind, now that October is here. We want to hear your favorite Halloween memories. Tell us about your best trick-or-treat haul. Share photos of your favorite costume. And let us know what you're planning to do or be this Halloween.

Email your stories and photos to nschwind@ydr.com by Oct. 15, or call 717-771-2038.

LEFTOVER HALLOWEEN CANDY? Do you make cookies, crafts or other items with your children's pillowcases full of confections? Email your ideas to bwilson@ydr.com or or call 717-771-2102.

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Coming in November:

ARE YOU A VEGAN or vegetarian? How do you deal with all the food-oriented events during the holiday season from Thanksgiving through New Year's?

Do family and friends prepare special dishes for you, or do you make do with the vegetables accompanying the main course? Do you bring a vegan or vegetarian dish with you to holiday meals to share with non-vegans?

What would you like your non-vegan friends and relatives to know? The Weekly Record would love to hear your stories about navigating food offerings at holiday get-togethers. Feel free to share some favorite vegan/vegetarian recipes, too!

Oh, and if you're not vegan, but some of your guests are, what do you do to accommodate them?

Send your holiday vegan/vegetarian stories, recipes and photos to Rose Hayes, Weekly Record, 1891 Loucks Road, York 17408; email rose@ydr.com or weekly@ydr.com; or call 717-771-2077.

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Coming in December:

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE HOLIDAY WREATH? We'd love to see photos of wreaths your family

decorated with during past holiday seasons, or those you're planning to use this year.

We'd also like to hear where you got it, whether it was an heirloom, a gift or a purchase. Or maybe you created it yourself and would like to share the step-by-step process with readers.

Send photos and information to Rose Hayes, Weekly Record, 1891 Loucks Road, York 17408; email to rose@ydr.com or weekly@ydr.com; or call 717-771-2077. Deadline for submissions is Nov. 20.

HAVE ANY CHRISTMAS ORNAMENTS that hold a special memory? Maybe you have ornaments your kids made in school, something handed down from Mom and Dad or an ornament Grandma and Grandpa used on their Christmas tree.

Email Barb Krebs at barken@nfdc.net; call 717-235-1042; or mail to Barb Krebs, Weekly Record, 1891 Loucks Road, York, 17408.

Please include your name, phone number and email address.