Kitty Heidlebaugh’s recipe for chicken cordon bleu casserole is included in "An Abundance of Grace,’ a cookbook published by Grace United
Kitty Heidlebaugh's recipe for chicken cordon bleu casserole is included in "An Abundance of Grace,' a cookbook published by Grace United Methodist Church in Shrewsbury Township. submitted

Grace United Methodist Church in Shrewsbury Township has published a new cookbook titled "An Abundance of Grace."

The book contains 300 recipes, from old favorites to newer cuisine, chairperson Kitty Heidlebaugh said.

"It had to be generational," she said of the book. "Recipes only survive if they are passed down to the next generation. Yes, there are changes, but the basic recipe is preserved."

Here, committee members Heidlebaugh, Dorothy Steltzer, Jan Allen, Julie Allen and Shirley Carbaugh share some of their favorite recipes and the stories behind them.

Chicken cordon bleu casserole

· 8 skinless, boneless chicken breasts

· 8 slices baked luncheon ham

· 8 slices American or provolone cheese

· 1 can cream of chicken, celery or mushroom soup

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Jan Allen said she found this recipe in a cookbook from Current. She said in the 1980s, a friend in Australia suggested leaving the bananas whole rather
Jan Allen said she found this recipe in a cookbook from Current. She said in the 1980s, a friend in Australia suggested leaving the bananas whole rather than slicing them, and she's been making them that way ever since. submitted
In a greased casserole dish, place 4 chicken breasts. Top each with a slice of ham and a slice of cheese.

Add second layer of chicken breasts and repeat topping each with a slice of ham and cheese.

Cover with cream soup. Bake for 1 hour.

"This was a recipe I discovered quite by accident some 30 years ago when we were attending so many church potluck suppers. I needed something that was quick and easy to make, yet was nutritional and a bit different," Kitty Heidlebaugh said. "Making chicken cordon bleu is labor-intensive; however, when done in a casserole as this recipe outlines it is a cinch, and an empty dish is always returned. This has always been a huge hit with my girls as they were growing up, and now my grandkids, as well. Of course, it still makes its way to church potlucks when necessary."

Sweet hot mustard dip

· 4-ounce container dried mustard

· 3 eggs

· 1 cup sugar

· 1 cup vinegar

· ½ teaspoon salt

Put all ingredients in blender and blend well. Pour into medium pan and bring to a boil.

Reduce heat to low and cook until desired thickness, stirring frequently for about 30 minutes.

Jan Allen said she found this recipe in a cookbook from Current. She said in the 1980s, a friend in Australia suggested leaving the bananas whole rather
Jan Allen said she found this recipe in a cookbook from Current. She said in the 1980s, a friend in Australia suggested leaving the bananas whole rather than slicing them, and she's been making them that way ever since. submitted

"This recipe was given to me by my daughter Abbey Heidlebaugh. Huge favorite when paired with cheeses, pretzels and crackers. Just be careful; this dip has some kick to it," Heidlebaugh said.

Wonderful veggie soup

· 1½ lbs beef pot roast

· Water

· 2 stalks celery, sliced

· 1 large onion, chopped

· Water

· Carrots, sliced

· Green beans, sliced, as many as you like

· 1 small can corn, undrained

· 10-ounce package frozen peas

· 10-ounce package frozen lima beans

· 1 large can tomatoes

· 1 medium can tomato sauce

· 2 beef bullion cubes

· 3 large potatoes, diced

· Handful of barley

Put pot roast, cut up small, in deep pot and cover with water.

Dorothy Nuss submitted a recipe for Wonderful Veggie Soup to Grace UMC’s cookbook, ’An Abundance of Grace.’ submitted
Dorothy Nuss submitted a recipe for Wonderful Veggie Soup to Grace UMC's cookbook, 'An Abundance of Grace.' submitted
Bring to a boil and lower heat, cooking slowly until meat is tender. Add celery and onion.

Bring covered pot to a boil again, adding water as needed. When onions are transparent, add all ingredients except potatoes and barley. Cook on low heat one hour. Always keep just covered with water, and stir often.

Add potatoes, with or without skins. Bring back to boil until potatoes are done (15 to 12 minutes). Fifteen minutes before serving, add barley and cook until soft to thicken broth.

- DOROTHY NUSS

Weak-in-the-knees chocolate mousse

· 14-ounce can sweetened, condensed milk

· 2/3 cup water

· Four-serving package cook-and-serve chocolate pudding

· 1 ounce 60-percent chocolate

· 2 cups whipping cream, stiffly whipped

In large saucepan, combine condensed milk, water and pudding; mix well. Add chocolate. Cook over medium heat, stirring rapidly and constantly, until chocolate melts and mixture thickens.

Remove from heat. Beat until smooth. Cool; then chill thoroughly. Stir; then fold in whipped cream.

Chill four hours, until set.

"I love any food that makes my eyes cross and my knees go weak; this mousse does both," Julie Allen said. "Warning: if you share this mousse with others, side effects may include gazes of adoration, murmurs of appreciation, and professions of love."

Queen's cake

· 1 cup boiling water

· 1 cup dates

· 1 teaspoon baking soda

· 1 cup brown sugar

· ¼ cup butter

· 1 egg, beaten

· 1 teaspoon vanilla

· 1½ cups sifted flour

· 1 teaspoon baking powder

· ½ teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Julie Allen said this buttercream frosting ’pipes like a dream,’ is very easy to make and you can make it any flavor by using a different
Julie Allen said this buttercream frosting 'pipes like a dream,' is very easy to make and you can make it any flavor by using a different extract. submitted
 Pour 1 cup boiling water over dates and baking soda.

While dates are soaking, cream together brown sugar, butter, egg and vanilla.

In a separate bowl, mix together flour, baking powder and salt. Add dry mixture to creamed mixture. Mix until smooth, then pour into date mixture. Bake 35 to 45 minutes.

Icing

· 5 tablespoons cream

· 5 tablespoons brown sugar

· 2 tablespoons butter

· ½ cup broken pecans or walnuts

· ½ cup coconut

In a small saucepan, combine cream, brown sugar and butter. Cook briefly until well blended. Spread icing over cake while cake is still hot. Top with coconut and chopped nuts.

This recipe was submitted by Heidlebaugh's father, Richard Burke.

"My Mom made this cake all the time when we were children and we all loved it. It is a very moist, heavy cake and is loaded with coconut and dates and the icing is laden with walnuts," Heidlebaugh said. "One of my very favorites and, of course, great with a cup of hot coffee or Darjeeling tea."

Granola

· 5 cups uncooked rolled oats

·1/3 cup instant non-fat dry milk

· 1 cup flaked coconut

· 1 cup blanched almonds

· 1 cup pecans or walnut halves

· ½ to 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

· ½ cup honey

· ½ cup brown sugar, firmly packed

· 1½ teaspoons vanilla

· 2 cups dried fruit (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine oats, milk, coconut, almonds, and nuts in a large bowl. Mix well.

In saucepan over medium-low heat, combine oil, honey and brown sugar, stirring frequently. Cook only until brown sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and add vanilla.

Pour wet mixture over dry ingredients and mix. Spread in a sheet pan. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes. During the last 5 minutes, stir in dried fruit.

Tip: You don't need to grease the cookie sheet if you remove the granola within a few minutes after removing the sheet from the oven.

This recipe was "given to me by my daughter Lindi Gohn," Kitty Heidlebaugh said. "This is a weekly process for her family as they are huge fans of homemade granola."

Banana cream pie

· 9-inch baked pastry shell

· ¼ cup cornstarch

· 2/3 cup sugar

· ¼ teaspoon salt

· 2 cups milk

· 3 egg yolks, slightly beaten

· 2 tablespoons butter

· 1 teaspoon vanilla

· 3 bananas

Combine cornstarch, sugar and salt in a saucepan. Gradually add milk; blend well. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thick.

Blend small amount of hot mixture into egg yolks, then add to hot mixture in saucepan. Cook 1 minute. Add butter and vanilla and blend well. Cover and cool to lukewarm, stirring occasionally.

Slice bananas into pie shell. Add filling and top with whipped cream or meringue.

"I found this recipe in a cookbook from Current. Remember them? They used to be a fundraising merchandiser. The company is still around, but is purely retail now," Jan Allen said. "Anyway, my husband really likes this pie. In the '80s while we were living in Australia, a friend suggested I leave the bananas whole instead of slicing them. I've been making it like that ever since."

Buttercream frosting

· 2 sticks butter, softened

· 1 pound powdered sugar

· ¼ teaspoon salt

· 1½ tablespoons milk

· ½ teaspoon flavored extract (vanilla, maple, peppermint, etc.)

Cream butter; add liquids and salt. Add powdered sugar; mix until fluffy. Makes 3 cups.

"Easiest frosting and you can make it any flavor just by using a different extract. Pipes like a dream," Julie Allen said.

Buy the book

'AN ABUNDANCE OF GRACE,' a new cookbook published by Grace United Methodist Church in Shrewsbury Township, is available for purchase. Cost is $13.

To purchase a copy, call 717-235-4029 or email graceumc@gumcpa.org.

Proceeds will support the church's food pantry ministry, Gifts of Grace, which distributes food to all members of the community in need of help.

Tell us

SHARE YOUR RECIPES and food-related stories with our readers by emailing barken@nfdc.net; calling 717-235-1042; or writing to Barb Krebs, Weekly Record, 1891 Loucks Road, York 17408.

You are also welcome to request a recipe or suggest a topic for the food column.